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Five fundamental tips for long term investors

If are the kind of person who wants to take an active part in your investing and not let some other person do it for you, then you have to be prepared to do a few basic things to make it more likely that you are happy with your investment choices and with their performance.

Investing is a very personal choice because it is not without financial risk, but as any honest financial expert will tell you, with investing, you’ll likely gain more than you’ll lose if you make the effort to learn about your investments and make sound decisions. But at the same time, there are no guarantees, and you need to be prepared for losses and gains. You also need to be patient. Don’t expect to see a return on investments for several months, and it could take a year or more for you to see a significant return from any investments. The following five investing tips should help you get started in the world of investing, but if you have questions or specific concerns or just want some reassurance, you should definitely get in touch with a local financial advisor or an investment firm.

  1. Be prepared to spend money for stocks and other paper assets: Stocks, mutual funds, and other paper investments is one financial area where you really will have to spend money in order to make money. But it’s easy to see why this is the case: you need money to purchase these kinds of assets. Once purchased, so long as they perform well enough, your stocks will earn your money. And on that note, be prepared for even the best performing of stocks to lose on occasion. It happens to even the most conservative and frugal of investors, so don’t beat yourself up too badly if you end up investing in a stock (or even a couple of stocks) that winds up under-performing.
  2. Be patient
    Rome wasn’t built in a day, and neither is a company. Even already-running companies will need some time to take the capital they receive and convert it into a successful company. On average, it can take a company who’s selling stock six or more months to begin showing even a moderate return on the capital they received.
  3. Build a portfolio of paper assets: It’s understandable that you’d like to play it safe by going for low-risk stocks or other low-risk paper assets, but if you want to have a great portfolio that won’t let you down, mix things up a bit. Try to have about 60 percent of your shares in low-risk companies, 25 percent in moderate-risk stocks, and the remaining 15 percent in high-risk stocks. Low-risk and moderate-risk stocks will keep you balanced, while the loss from a small percentage of high-risk stocks will not hit hard – but on the other hand, gains from those high-risk stocks could certainly have a nice impact.
  4. Look beyond paper assets: While stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and other paper assets are by far the most common investment vehicles for the average person, the investing universe is a lot bigger than just paper. Starting your own business, however small, may be a great way for you to get an economic benefit from your personal skills and connections. Like paper assets, businesses both large and small have risks, so it may be best to start small so that your mistakes don’t hurt you that much.
  5. Keep learning: Once you are committed to investing, you should also be committed to learning about investing. Between the Internet and your local library, you have access to more information about investing and investments than you can possibly learn in ten lifetimes. However, you are not investing in every option under the sun, so you can easily focus your learning to those areas where you are either investing in now or plan to invest in the future. The day you think you don’t need to learn is the day that you should hire someone else to do your thinking for you.
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